Smart-Schools-bond

Schools Awash In Free Cuomo Cash – Will students get their fair share?

cuomo-edu-hero1

 

 

Love him or hate him,  the man knows how to bring home the education bacon.

 

 

 2015-2016 Education aid by the numbers:

$1.67 billion increase (7.65%) + $2 billion in Smart bonds (9.1%)  = $3.6 billion tidal wave.

All of the budgetary hand wringing and apologizing in Albany has resulted in a 

Jaw Dropping 16.5% spending increase in one year! 

It’s party time at the biggest employer in YOUR town!

 

Strings attached?

Who cares? Your school is going to need extra mattresses to hide this much money.

 

A local multi-million dollar spending festival is about to begin…

 

Right now school boards across NY are busy tossing out the “we’re starving” budget from last week and replacing it with a shiny new example of where to stash those free greenbacks so they can  still claim they’re starving. With all of this extra cash,  it’s going to be a tough job this year.   Those financial wizards of the purposefully vague & confusing spending plans haven’t seen this kind of money swamping in at least 2 years. For them, this is the after-party… Let the good times roll with billions in EXTRA Free Cuomo Bucks!

 

Parents need to get on the  feeding frenzy festivities…

Time is short – the big money will vanish fast into the annual industry standard excuse… the mysterious “unfunded mandate”. According to media wonk’s – everything from floor mops to ergonomic chairs are mandated and unfunded.  Make your plans now & get your piece of the hot fair share action.  Don’t think twice about school employees… they  got their contract cash coming no matter what the budget big shots say.

 

Suggested party plans…

Not sure what to ask for? Don’t bribe the teacher with a free apple, DEMAND every classroom spending budget be tripled with FREE money from the pseudo-gods of Albany!  The teachers know where to spend that classroom money better than any fat cat school bureaucrat. Give em’ a classroom spending spree of mind numbing epic proportions!  Remember… classroom spending accounts really are for the children!

 

Your friends are invited too…

Everybody knows there is power in numbers… band together with your rebel friends -show up to that budget meeting and  yell louder than anyone else!  Dive head first into this annual cash orgy – show those special interests and board scrooges how to party!

 

100% Guilt Free…

Don’t try to fix this year’s problem – that’s ancient history. Be Progressive! Demand they back up those cash laden dump trucks into the future classrooms of your own children. Be self centered – Be greedy – It’s OK! Your efforts will help every child behind yours for years to come… there is no shame in that!

 

Ignore those pesky media claims…

Those jerks wouldn’t have the guts to print this headline “Schools bursting with cash” …that would wipe out a year’s worth of sob stories.  They need this money to go away fast to save those ad dollars & to keep you away from the biggest multi-million dollar spending party in town. No need to RSVP!!! Get in there and fill up the student swag bag!

 

Act Fast… this is a limited time offer…

Final budgets are due soon for the big vote in May… we’re talking extra billions to be spent in the next 6 weeks!  This kind of free money bonanza may not come around till the next election season. Hurry – billions in Free Cuomo Bucks will disappear faster than a 3rd world aid package!

 

Send No Money Back Guarantee!

Nobody ever sends pre-approved free money back to Albany.  Act now! Get the student’s fair share today!

 

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Lakeland Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Lakeland Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Lakeland Central School District in the county of Westchester is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Lakeland parents, teachers, students and Lakeland community members.

 

 

Lakeland Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Lakeland District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Lakeland 2014 enrollment:  6046 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $38,336,140 $180,811 $192,247 $3,648,705
Per Student $6,340.74 $29.91 $31.80 $603.49
Percentage 0.150% 0.212% 0.050% 0.182%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Lakeland Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Lakeland  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Lakeland Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Lakeland Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Lakeland received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Yorktown Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Yorktown Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Yorktown Central School District in the county of Westchester is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Yorktown parents, teachers, students and Yorktown community members.

 

 

Yorktown Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Yorktown District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Yorktown 2014 enrollment:  3615 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $16,458,633 $105,188 $0 $1,463,127
Per Student $4,552.87 $29.10 $0.00 $404.74
Percentage 0.056% 0.123% 0.000% 0.073%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Yorktown Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Yorktown  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Yorktown Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Yorktown Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Yorktown received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Attica Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Attica Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Attica Central School District in the county of Wyoming is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Attica parents, teachers, students and Attica community members.

 

 

Attica Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Attica District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Attica 2014 enrollment:  1430 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $15,834,911 $45,860 $0 $1,499,221
Per Student $11,073.36 $32.07 $0.00 $1,048.41
Percentage 0.073% 0.054% 0.000% 0.075%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Attica Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Attica  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Attica Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Attica Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Attica received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Letchworth Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Letchworth Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Letchworth Central School District in the county of Wyoming is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Letchworth parents, teachers, students and Letchworth community members.

 

 

Letchworth Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Letchworth District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Letchworth 2014 enrollment:  918 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $11,910,270 $30,395 $0 $1,203,133
Per Student $12,974.15 $33.11 $0.00 $1,310.60
Percentage 0.065% 0.036% 0.000% 0.060%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Letchworth Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Letchworth  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Letchworth Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Letchworth Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Letchworth received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Wyoming Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Wyoming Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Wyoming Central School District in the county of Wyoming is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Wyoming parents, teachers, students and Wyoming community members.

 

 

Wyoming Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Wyoming District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Wyoming 2014 enrollment:  146 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $2,360,800 $4,082 $0 $241,845
Per Student $16,169.86 $27.96 $0.00 $1,656.47
Percentage 0.010% 0.005% 0.000% 0.012%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Wyoming Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Wyoming  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Wyoming Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Wyoming Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Wyoming received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Perry Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Perry Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Perry Central School District in the county of Wyoming is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Perry parents, teachers, students and Perry community members.

 

 

Perry Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Perry District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Perry 2014 enrollment:  837 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $9,769,564 $30,595 $93,758 $913,171
Per Student $11,672.12 $36.55 $112.02 $1,091.00
Percentage 0.046% 0.036% 0.024% 0.046%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Perry Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Perry  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Perry Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Perry Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Perry received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District in the county of Westchester is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Blind Brook-Rye parents, teachers, students and Blind Brook-Rye community members.

 

 

Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Blind Brook-Rye District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Blind Brook-Rye 2014 enrollment:  1468 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $2,546,125 $27,086 $0 $195,893
Per Student $1,734.42 $18.45 $0.00 $133.44
Percentage 0.008% 0.032% 0.000% 0.010%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Blind Brook-Rye  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Blind Brook-Rye Union Free School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Blind Brook-Rye received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Warsaw Central School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Warsaw Central School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Warsaw Central School District in the county of Wyoming is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Warsaw parents, teachers, students and Warsaw community members.

 

 

Warsaw Central School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Warsaw District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Warsaw 2014 enrollment:  959 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $10,639,378 $31,282 $71,123 $1,001,822
Per Student $11,094.24 $32.62 $74.16 $1,044.65
Percentage 0.046% 0.037% 0.018% 0.050%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Warsaw Central School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Warsaw  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Warsaw Central School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Warsaw Central School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Warsaw received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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Smart Schools Bond Act – What it means for Scarsdale Union Free School District

 

moneycapNY’s 2014-2015 budget includes the $2 billion Smart Schools Bond Act to be put before voters in the November 2014 election. Should it pass, Scarsdale Union Free School District will receive a proportional share of the $2 billion based on the proportion of total formula school aid the district receives.

To receive the funds, Scarsdale Union Free School District in the county of Westchester is required to submit a detailed plan to a state review board. In developing plans, the school district is required to consult with appropriate stakeholders, including Scarsdale parents, teachers, students and Scarsdale community members.

 

 

Scarsdale Union Free School District Smart Schools Capital Projects can include:

  • Acquiring learning technology equipment or facilities including interactive whiteboards; computer servers, desktop, laptop and tablet computers;
  • Installing high-speed broadband or wireless Internet connectivity for schools and communities
  • Constructing, enhancing and modernizing educational facilities to accommodate prekindergarten programs
  • Providing instructional space to replace transportable classroom units
  • Installing high-tech security features in school buildings and on school campuses, including installation of high-tech security features such as video surveillance, emergency notification systems and physical access controls

 

 

Scarsdale District numbers for parents and taxpayers to consider:

 

Scarsdale 2014 enrollment:  4739 students

Funding type Formula Aid Hardware/Software Pre-k Bond Allocation
State Total $21,280,313,886 $85,204,216 $385,034,734 $2 Billion
District Share $5,906,369 $76,487 $0 $444,960
Per Student $1,246.33 $16.14 $0.00 $93.89
Percentage 0.022% 0.090% 0.000% 0.022%

 

Not enough money.

A significant problem with this bond is that a district might spend on getting broadband access and a few computers while another district may spend the money on building pre-k classroooms. There just isn’t enough money unless Scarsdale Union Free School District already has high speed access, pre-k and a somewhat robust technology department. Even then, the legacy costs of maintaining additional salaries, pensions, benefits and technology will belong to Scarsdale  taxpayers. Similarly, Obama’s Race to the top program required all sorts of added services while providing pennies per student. As with this bond,  it was big on “progressive” ideas and short on methods to pay for and maintain it. In the end it will likely result in higher local property taxes and state taxes (AKA- state aid).

 

3 technology spending examples:

Every district is required to have a technology plan. Most districts put these documents online for public review. Within this document you can get a general idea of the district equipment, class types, personnel and costs. Once you know what your local district has and roughly how much it costs, the proposed bond allocation may seem pointless or a jackpot. Keep in mind,  mandatory pre-k costs for some districts will absorb a significant portion of the allocation.

 

District  Oceanside  Scarsdale  Fredonia
Enrollment 5,732 4,739 1,502
2013 spending* $1.5 million/yr $920,000 $550,000
Bond allocation $1.9 million $444,0000 $1.1 million

*Spending numbers taken from the district’s technology plan, which may or may not reflect actual dollar amounts spent. Dollar amounts have been rounded.

As you can tell, some districts will be shorted while others will see a onetime increase depending on their current formula aid from the state. In the end, everyone will pay for the borrowed money.

Find the Scarsdale Union Free School District technology plan with a pre-linked search at  Bing.

 

Don’t vote without knowing your local plan.

 
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.
25 ton door at Cheyenne Mountain.

The $2 billion Smart Schools Bond is set to be voted on in November 2014.  That being said, Scarsdale Union Free School District parents, taxpayers and community members should pay close attention to what the  district is planning to do with this money.  You may find the media pushing the idea that everyone is getting a laptop while your district has to buy a building for mandatory preschool services and decides it needs to install video surveillance.  Then again, you may wind up with a front door that will stop a tank. Every district has different needs.

Click here to see how little Scarsdale received in Race To The Top funds.

 

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